Full Course Description


LIVE | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: The Strengths-Based Perspective

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Appraise the four precepts of a strengths-based approach.
  2. Identify five reasons why the strengths-based approach builds a trusting therapeutic alliance.
  3. Investigate how clients construct meaning behind traumatic events.
  4. Evaluate the diagnostic criteria for PTSD as well as the changes that have been made to the DSM regarding the diagnosis.
  5. Identify four risk factors that increase the possibility of developing PTSD after a traumatic experience.
  6. Distinguish between and extrapolate the possible biological reactions to threat and trauma.
  7. Critique the manifestation of the fawning response related to childhood abuse.

Outline

Copyright : 09/02/2021

SELF-STUDY | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: The Strengths-Based Perspective

In this 6-hour recording, we will set the stage for a clinical and philosophical approach to trauma-informed treatment, which will include an in-depth exploration of a strengths-based, de-pathologized approach to assessing and treating clients.  

We will process the features of therapy and the therapeutic relationship that promote an emphasis on clients’ resiliency and courage, while learning ways to help clients re-frame and “make sense” out of their long-term struggles and destructive coping strategies.  

Participants will learn about the power of clients’ “meaning-making” in response to threatening or abusive life events, and how those cognitions either intensify or lessen the long-term effects of trauma. 

We will also process the new diagnostic criteria for PTSD including: exposure; intrusive symptoms; avoidance; and negative alterations in cognitions and mood. We will look at the factors that make it more or less likely for a traumatized person to develop PTSD and weave those dynamics into the assessment phase of treatment. We will explore the potential biological responses to perceived threat including: social engagement; fight or flight; fawn; and freeze. Participants will learn about the physiological reactions that are set in motion when we are confronted with life-threatening scenarios, the hierarchy of how we want to respond, and the inevitable ways in which we are often forced to respond in order to stay safe. 

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Appraise the four precepts of a strengths-based approach.
  2. Identify five reasons why the strengths-based approach builds a trusting therapeutic alliance.
  3. Investigate how clients construct meaning behind traumatic events.
  4. Evaluate the diagnostic criteria for PTSD as well as the changes that have been made to the DSM regarding the diagnosis.
  5. Identify four risk factors that increase the possibility of developing PTSD after a traumatic experience.
  6. Distinguish between and extrapolate the possible biological reactions to threat and trauma.
  7. Critique the manifestation of the fawning response related to childhood abuse.

Outline

Copyright : 09/02/2021

LIVE | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: Trauma, Memory, and the Brain

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Differentiate our historical understanding of the brain with our newest understanding, including the role that neuroplasticity can play. 
  2. Employ at least six strategies to help clients foster greater neuroplasticity. 
  3. Assess the four major “desires” of the adolescent brain and how it differs from an adult brain. 
  4. Evaluate the negative impact that trauma and repeated fight/flight responses have on the different parts of the brain. 
  5. Analyze the impact that chronic childhood trauma has on declarative and non-declarative memory. 
  6. Organize a model of where trauma is stored in the brain and why “talk therapy” alone does not allow clients to access and metabolize their experiences. 
  7. Theorize about inter-regulation and auto-regulation and why an infant cannot self-soothe if they are not first co-regulated.  
  8. Employ at least five ways that primary caretakers can create secure attachment with an infant. 

Outline

Copyright : 09/14/2021

SELF-STUDY | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: Trauma, Memory, and the Brain

In this six-hour recording, we will look at the ways in which our brains are adversely impacted by trauma and how the concept of neuroplasticity can reverse that impact. Participants will learn how to strengthen neuroplasticity in traumatized clients through lifestyle choices including: exercise, improved sleep hygiene, humor, connecting to others, and healthy risk-taking. We will then process the unique aspects of the developing adolescent brain, comparing it to the functionality of an adult brain, and exploring both the limitations and strengths of the adolescent mindset. Since many traumatized teens use digital apparatuses to dissociate, we will look at the adverse impact of digital technology and gaming on the adolescent brain. 

Participants will get an introduction to the “triune brain” and will learn about the key functions of the brain stem, limbic system and pre-frontal cortex. We will explore the ways in which our brains are wired to respond to perceived threat, and why the chronicity of childhood abuse adversely impacts the limbic system and clients’ abilities to accurately process their experiences.  

We will distinguish between declarative and non-declarative memory and how trauma's impact on the brain creates “speechless terror” for clients, making it difficult to articulate their experiences with words. 

We will also address the fundamental developmental need to attach and explore the verbal and non-verbal ways that parents can foster secure attachment with an infant. We will look at the process of inter-regulation and auto-regulation and the child’s need for co-regulation in order to be soothed. Revisiting the negative effects of technology, we will process the toll it takes on secure attachment when parents are distracted by digital devices. 

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Differentiate our historical understanding of the brain with our newest understanding, including the role that neuroplasticity can play. 
  2. Employ at least six strategies to help clients foster greater neuroplasticity. 
  3. Assess the four major “desires” of the adolescent brain and how it differs from an adult brain. 
  4. Evaluate the negative impact that trauma and repeated fight/flight responses have on the different parts of the brain. 
  5. Analyze the impact that chronic childhood trauma has on declarative and non-declarative memory. 
  6. Organize a model of where trauma is stored in the brain and why “talk therapy” alone does not allow clients to access and metabolize their experiences. 
  7. Theorize about inter-regulation and auto-regulation and why an infant cannot self-soothe if they are not first co-regulated.  
  8. Employ at least five ways that primary caretakers can create secure attachment with an infant. 

Outline

Copyright : 09/14/2021

LIVE | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: The Impact of Insecure Attachment

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Categorize the manifestations of secure attachment between primary caretaker and child. 
  2. Distinguish between the three insecure attachment patterns that abused and neglected children are forced to navigate, and how children react when they are not securely attached.  
  3. Investigate the fight, flight and freeze reactions that parents who do disorganized attachment exhibit to their children and identify at least four ways that disorganized attachment manifests in the child’s subsequent relationships. 
  4. Analyze the optimal window of arousal and give examples of hyper-arousal and hypo-arousal. 
  5. Practice and illustrate the concept of “shifting the locus of control” as a coping strategy that children must use to attach to abusive caretakers. 
  6. Employ at least six ways that children are impacted when their caretaker is their perpetrator. 
  7. Practice at least four dysfunctional parenting styles that disregard boundaries, the child’s normal emotional needs, and their right to have consistency and safety. 
  8. Categorize at least 10 dysfunctional family of origin dynamics that pertain to roles, boundaries, communication cognitions, and perceptions. 
  9. Categorize at least 10 “dysfunctional” coping strategies that children must evolve in response to toxic or abusive family-of-origin dynamics. 

Outline

Copyright : 10/01/2021

SELF-STUDY | Understanding Trauma and its Reverberating Effects: The Impact of Insecure Attachment

In this 6-hour recording, we will use videotaped examples to explore the four major attachment styles: secure; avoidant; ambivalent; and disorganized. Participants will learn about the profound impact of insecure attachment and neglect on the developing architecture of an infant’s brain, as well as the physical, emotional, social, and behavioral impact of not being securely attached. We will explore the dysfunctional dynamics of disorganized attachment and how they subsequently play out in a traumatized client’s future relationships, including the therapeutic relationship.  We will connect attachment issues to affect regulation and dysregulation, processing the concept of the “optimal window of arousal” and exploring the impact that hyper-arousal and hypo-arousal have on clients’ presentations in and outside of therapy sessions. 

Participants will learn about the challenge that children face when they are forced to attach to abusive caretakers and the cognitive and emotional price they pay for taking ownership of the abuse. We will process attachment trauma and how depressed or unavailable parents react to their child’s needs. Viewing the Still Face video, we will discuss the ways in which children react to parental mis-attunement. We will also look at the negative impact on children when a trusted caretaker is also their perpetrator. 

As we explore several different dysfunctional parenting styles, we will process the “coping strategies’ that children must evolve to navigate and survive parents who are shaming, overly demanding, inappropriately boundaried, emotionally unavailable, or aggressively abusive. 

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Categorize the manifestations of secure attachment between primary caretaker and child. 
  2. Distinguish between the three insecure attachment patterns that abused and neglected children are forced to navigate, and how children react when they are not securely attached.  
  3. Investigate the fight, flight and freeze reactions that parents who do disorganized attachment exhibit to their children and identify at least four ways that disorganized attachment manifests in the child’s subsequent relationships. 
  4. Analyze the optimal window of arousal and give examples of hyper-arousal and hypo-arousal. 
  5. Practice and illustrate the concept of “shifting the locus of control” as a coping strategy that children must use to attach to abusive caretakers. 
  6. Employ at least six ways that children are impacted when their caretaker is their perpetrator. 
  7. Practice at least four dysfunctional parenting styles that disregard boundaries, the child’s normal emotional needs, and their right to have consistency and safety. 
  8. Categorize at least 10 dysfunctional family of origin dynamics that pertain to roles, boundaries, communication cognitions, and perceptions. 
  9. Categorize at least 10 “dysfunctional” coping strategies that children must evolve in response to toxic or abusive family-of-origin dynamics. 

Outline

Copyright : 10/01/2021

LIVE | Creatively and Effectively Treating Trauma: The Foundation of Trauma-Informed Care

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Utilize at least three key concepts from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) and their relevance to trauma work. 
  2. Categorize at least ten adult manifestations of childhood abuse or neglect and explain why earlier experiences led to those adult dysfunctional behaviors. 
  3. Utilize ‘trauma-informed” assessment and differentiate it from an intake that is more likely to trigger the client.  
  4. Develop a plan for how a therapist’s counter-transference can adversely impact the assessment and intake process. 
  5. Practice at least six “less threatening” questions that can be asked when gathering information about family-of-origin experiences. 
  6. Integrate at least six features that define a “trauma informed” therapist. 
  7. Justify at least three reasons why some clients do not want to do trauma related work in an online format. 
  8. Practice at least three strategies to create external safety in a therapy session. 
  9. Demonstrate the “safe place” collage to help resource and reground clients.

Outline

Copyright : 10/13/2021

SELF-STUDY | Creatively and Effectively Treating Trauma: The Foundation of Trauma-Informed Care

In this 6-hour recording, we will make the connection between the inevitable coping strategies that emerge for abused and neglected children and how those behaviors create suffering and dysfunction in adulthood. We will explore the impact that trauma has on their adult relationships, career choices, ability or inability to engage in self-care,  self-advocacy, and self-protection. We will process the co-morbid issues that adult survivors struggle with as they attempt to navigate, self-medicate or numb, the thoughts, feelings and memories associated with past trauma. Particular attention will be paid to doing “trauma-informed” assessments that appropriately pace the work and prevent clients from becoming triggered, dysregulated, or overwhelmed early in the therapy process. Participants will learn how to gather information about clients’ histories while maintaining a strengths-based approach. We will also take into consideration intakes, assessments, and treatment that is done by tele-therapy, where extra attention must be paid to issues including privacy, confidentiality, and pacing. 

We will also process the “foundation” of trauma treatment, including: the creation of internal and external safety; strategies to address affect dysregulation; ongoing pacing and anchoring for stabilization; containment; and connection to external resources for support. Participants will have the opportunity to practice creating a safe place collage. Additional strategies designed to keep clients in the optimal window of arousal will be processed as well. 

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Utilize at least three key concepts from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study (ACES) and their relevance to trauma work. 
  2. Categorize at least ten adult manifestations of childhood abuse or neglect and explain why earlier experiences led to those adult dysfunctional behaviors. 
  3. Utilize ‘trauma-informed” assessment and differentiate it from an intake that is more likely to trigger the client.  
  4. Develop a plan for how a therapist’s counter-transference can adversely impact the assessment and intake process. 
  5. Practice at least six “less threatening” questions that can be asked when gathering information about family-of-origin experiences. 
  6. Integrate at least six features that define a “trauma informed” therapist. 
  7. Justify at least three reasons why some clients do not want to do trauma related work in an online format. 
  8. Practice at least three strategies to create external safety in a therapy session. 
  9. Demonstrate the “safe place” collage to help resource and reground clients.

Outline

Copyright : 10/13/2021

LIVE | Creatively and Effectively Treating Trauma: Strategies for Affect Regulation, Grounding, and Containment

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Apply at least three breathwork strategies to address either hyper-arousal or hypo-arousal. 
  2. Apply at least three strategies designed to target arousal modulation. 
  3. Practice at least three strategies rooted in somatic resourcing to help clients use their own bodies for grounding and self-soothing. 
  4. Theorize Gene Gendlin’s Focusing model and how to help clients turn inward to gain more awareness about the meta-communication of somatization. 
  5. Perform at least four art therapy techniques designed to help clients work through abuse memories, improve ego-strength, and self-esteem. 
  6. Use at least four open-ended questions to use when inviting clients to process and attach meaning-making to their artwork. 
  7. Practice the technique of “mapping” and how it can be beneficial when clients or clinicians lose a sense of focus or direction in therapy. 
  8. Practice at least three strategies to help clients short-circuit dissociation and flashbacks. 
  9. Analyze the concept of “re-storying” and how it can help to make abreactions productive rather than destructive. 

Outline

Copyright : 10/29/2021

LIVE | The Pharmacological and Non-Pharmacological Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in Trauma Survivors

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Differentiate the diagnostic criteria for assessing affective and anxiety disorders in trauma survivors. 
  2. Appraise the most commonly used anti-depressants and anxiolytics, and their potential side effects 
  3. Categorize at least six intra-psychic, inter-personal, or environmental stressors that can trigger or exacerbate an episode of depression. 
  4. Evaluate at least four “medication myths” that add to client resistance and explain how to work through those misconceptions to increase compliance. 
  5. Analyze the disadvantages to using supplements or medical marijuana for the treatment of depression, generalized anxiety disorder, or PTSD 
  6. Implement an appropriate assessment to address suicidal ideation. 
  7. Appraise at least four advantages to mental health providers working collaboratively with primary care physicians. 
  8. Assess at least five cognitive distortions that often accompany an episode of depression. 
  9. Distinguish between “response” to medication versus “remission” and why getting clients to remission is so important. 
  10. Justify the role of the “parts perspective” in the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. 
  11. Implement at least six non-pharmacological ways to treat depression and anxiety disorders in trauma survivors. 

Outline

Copyright : 11/10/2021

LIVE | Trauma and the Therapeutic Alliance: Bridging Therapy Sessions, Working with Self-Harm, and Traumatic Transference

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Assess the notion of seeking treatment from both clients’ and therapists’ perspectives and assess the similarities and differences that impact treatment outcomes. 
  2. Categorize at least six examples of the dysfunctional family-of-origin dynamics that can adversely impact the therapeutic relationship. 
  3. Construct a model of traumatic transference and summarize at least five manifestations in trauma survivors. 
  4. Categorize at least five ways in which trauma survivors test therapist boundaries and manifest trust issues in the therapeutic alliance. 
  5. Practice at least five questions designed to address cultural beliefs and their impact on therapy and the therapeutic relationship. 
  6. Propose at least four errors therapists can make that inadvertently trigger transferential responses in clients. 
  7. Propose at least three ways in which Covid has contributed to clients’ triggers regarding therapy and the client-therapist relationship. 
  8. Practice at least three concrete ways that therapists can safely address the issues of transference with their clients. 

Outline

Copyright : 11/29/2021

LIVE | Trauma and the Therapeutic Alliance: Understanding the Impact of Counter-Transference

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Analyze at least five inherent stressors that exist for helping professionals working with traumatized clients. 
  2. Differentiate between “internal” and “external” focus and explain the concept of dual awareness in therapy. 
  3. Analyze the roots of co-dependence and the family of origin dynamics that make a person vulnerable to needing constant external validation. 
  4. Theorize on the concept of vicarious traumatization and explain its relevance to the client-therapist relationship. 
  5. Assess at least four risk factors that make helping professionals vulnerable to secondary traumatization and four warning signs that indicate burn-out. 
  6. Theorize on the role of spirituality in trauma treatment and provide several examples of questions that can be used to assess for the viability of spirituality as a resource. 
  7. Categorize the four possible “reactive modes” that therapists can manifest when they are triggered and overcome by counter-transference. 
  8. Differentiate between empathic disequilibrium and empathic repression. 
  9. Analyze four examples of how vicarious traumatization manifests in the workplace. 

Outline

Copyright : 12/09/2021

LIVE | Trauma and the Therapeutic Alliance: Processing Ethics, Reporting Issues and Termination

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Investigate Dolgoff’s ethical principles and the hierarchy of professional responsibilities and obligations. 
  2. Categorize at least five red flags that indicate compromised therapists’ ethics 
  3. Determine the specific duties of practice including: the duty to protect life, to report and warn, and the preservation of client confidentiality. 
  4. Assess the legal issues of reporting abuse and neglect. 
  5. Analyze the impact that reporting has on the therapeutic relationship and identify ways to reframe reporting as an act of client empowerment. 
  6. Distinguish between five different termination modes and the roles that both clients and therapists play with each one. 
  7. Identify at least three clinical reasons why clients engage in unplanned terminations. 
  8. Catalogue the most appropriate process for planned terminations and identify at least four issues that emerge when therapy ends. 
  9. Construct a closing ritual for a planned termination that allows the client and therapist to celebrate successes in treatment. 

Outline

Copyright : 12/20/2021

Getting Creative with Parts

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Utilize specific expressive modalities to enhance internal safety as well as inner communication to improve client outcomes.
  2. Recommend creative techniques for improving client functioning, including reducing inner criticism, fragmentation, and polarization.
  3. Apply cognitive reframes and writing exercises to soften inner critics that cause clients to resist creative work in a clinical setting.
  4. Articulate which somatic resourcing techniques help clients deepen the connection and communication of internal parts.
  5. Analyze the efficacy of creative strategies to soothe traumatized parts and heighten internal safety in clients.
  6. Demonstrate the role of internal parts as supports or barriers in treatment of client struggles in order to increase the efficacy of treatment interventions and improve client level of functioning.

Outline

Value of Expressive Modalities
The Concept of Parts
Internal Family Systems
Core Self
Working with Parts

Copyright : 03/21/2019