Full Course Description


Updated Motivational Interviewing with Stephen Rollnick, Ph.D.: Evidence-Based Skills to Motivate Clients Toward Change

OUTLINE

Motivational Interviewing-3rd Edition

  • New 4-process framework
  • Compassion
  • MI in goal setting and change planning
  • From “behavior change” to change

Behavior Change and Motivational Interviewing

  • Ambivalence
  • The principles of MI are universal

Integrating Motivational Interviewing in Your Practice

  • MI complementing any therapeutic orientation
  • The language you and the client use makes a big difference!
  • Addressing motivational problems in:
    • Anxiety
    • Depression
    • Addictions
    • Medication adherence
    • Health behavior changes

The Traps that Prevent Change

  • Observe the traps
  • Apply MI skills to avoid traps
  • The “Righting Reflex”

Learning Motivational Interviewing

  • The spirit
  • Principles
  • Definition
  • Goal
  • Change talk & sustain talk
  • Skills

Core Skills of Motivational Interviewing

  • Listening—MI Style
  • The focus on change talk
  • Motivational Interviewing and communication styles

OBJECTIVES

  • Apply the New 4-Process Framework to your clinical practice.
  • Utilize the style underlying motivational interviewing to impact client change.
  • Investigate questions designed to explore ambivalence about change.
  • Recognize the limitations of the righting reflex and other traps to avoid when promoting change.
  • Define ambivalence and how best to respond to it.
  • Describe and recognize change language and how listening promotes change.
  • Summarize how motivational interviewing is linked to efforts to promote change in a variety of mental health settings.
Copyright : 04/04/2014

BONUS! MI in Action with Stephen Rollnick, Ph.D.: Presentation & Demo for Substance Abuse & Other Mental Health Disorders

OUTLINE

Why Motivational Interviewing (MI)?

  • Why is this approach to behavior change useful in tackling diverse and challenging client scenarios?  
  • Common errors like the “Righting Reflex”.
  • A new 4-process framework helps to navigate the interview and harness clients’ own motivation to change.

What does it look like in practice?

  • Getting alongside patients – doing this rapidly and effectively.
  • Locating a useful focus for change.  Agenda mapping as a strategy.
  • Evoking internal motivation using the “spirit” and core skills of MI

Getting yourself into gear

  • Adjusting your attitude and style
  • Slowing your pace down, noticing change and sustain talk
  • The core skills for doing this skillfully

OBJECTIVES

  • Describe what can go wrong with a premature, practitioner-centered approach.
  • Explain why and how motivational interviewing can fit into everyday practice.
  • Attempt to encourage yourself to develop your skills for putting MI into practice.

Program Information

Objectives

  • Describe what can go wrong with a premature, practitioner-centered approach.
  • Explain why and how motivational interviewing can fit into everyday practice.
  • Attempt to encourage yourself to develop your skills for putting MI into practice.

Outline

Why Motivational Interviewing (MI)?

  • Why is this approach to behavior change useful in tackling diverse and challenging client scenarios?  
  • Common errors like the “Righting Reflex”.
  • A new 4-process framework helps to navigate the interview and harness clients’ own motivation to change.

What does it look like in practice?

  • Getting alongside patients – doing this rapidly and effectively.
  • Locating a useful focus for change.  Agenda mapping as a strategy.
  • Evoking internal motivation using the “spirit” and core skills of MI

Getting yourself into gear

  • Adjusting your attitude and style
  • Slowing your pace down, noticing change and sustain talk
  • The core skills for doing this skillfully

Copyright : 06/03/2014

BONUS! Motivational Interviewing in Healthcare with Stephen Rollnick, Ph.D.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Describe what typically happens in consultations about lifestyle change and medication use.
  2. Explain why and how motivational interviewing can fit into everyday practice.
  3. Develop several of the skills involved and the changes you can make in practice.

Outline

Why Motivational Interviewing (MI)?

  • Why is this approach to behavior change useful in teaching “difficult” patients on lifestyle change?
  • What usually happens in brief consultations about lifestyle change and medication use? The “Righting Reflex” and other challenges
  • Helping patients to harness their own motivation for change
  • The evidence base for MI

What does it look like in practice?

  • Getting alongside patients as they make decisions: the “spirit of MI”
  • Rapid engagement & a 20% rule
  • A new framework for practice: engage, focus, evoke and plan
  • Addressing obesity, smoking cessation, alcohol/drug abuse, exercise and uncontrolled diabetes

Getting yourself into gear

  • Slowing your pace down
  • Adjusting your attitude and style
  • The skills involved

Copyright : 12/05/2013