Full Course Description


Trauma and the 12 Steps: The Fusion of Tradition and Innovation in Therapy

The interplay between unhealed trauma, dissociation, and addiction can stump even the most seasoned clinicians and leave clients who struggle feeling frustrated and hopeless. Although the popular 12-step approaches to addiction treatment can be appropriate for clients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related diagnoses, rigid application of the disease model and 12-step principles may prove more harmful than helpful for clients in need. Many professionals have written off the clinical utility of the 12-steps for this reason. In this recording, participants will learn how to blend traditional knowledge about the disease of addiction and 12-step approaches to recovery with the latest research and practice knowledge on trauma and dissociation. As a result, participants will be able to better connect with addicted clients who struggle with trauma, and deliver the help that they so desperately need in a way that honors their lived experience. Interaction, group participation, and experiential learning are all featured in this recording, sure to be a learning experience unlike any you have had before!

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Appraise the phenomena of trauma and dissociation in a complete manner for clients at all levels of care.
  2. Theorize how certain features of 12-step recovery are productive for working with addicted survivors of trauma stress and identify how these features can be implemented into treatment.
  3. Describe how certain 12-step approaches, slogans, and customs may be counterproductive when working with a traumatized client, both in treatment and in recovery communities.
  4. Develop a plan for working 12-step recovery strategies alongside appropriate treatment at any level of care.
  5. Apply at least two clinical techniques from various psychotherapeutic approaches to help clients attain addiction recovery in a trauma-sensitive fashion.

Outline

  • Updates to what works about 12-step models with language that is more trauma-informed and trauma-focused
  • Working with your clients on meaningful life style changes through 12 steps
  • How the often misunderstood clinical concept of dissociation is the key to better defining, understanding, and treating addictions

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/06/2022

Medication Treatment of Substance Use Disorders: What Therapists Need to Know

Over 100,000 people died of drug overdoses from April 2021 to March 2022, with over 70% of those deaths due to fentanyl or other powerful synthetic opioids. Medications like methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone, and naloxone offer the best results in treating opioid use disorder, but many clients lack access to these treatments. Mental health clinicians need to be knowledgeable about medications for opioid use disorders (MOUD), and how to engage clients who are considering MOUD, or who receive MOUD. Effective behavioral health treatments that can be integrated with MOUD will be discussed, including case studies from the field. We will also examine how stigma continues to keep MOUD, and SUD treatment in general, from making a greater impact in our communities.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Catalogue the primary substances that are killing Americans at the highest rate in history.
  2. Analyze how traumatic events have a “special” connection with opioids, and why this must be considered in all treatment settings.
  3. Appraise the medications used to treat opioid use disorder, and medications under study to treat stimulant use disorder.
  4. Practice strategies to engage clients considering MOUD and clients who are already engaged in MOUD.
  5. Theorize how stigma impacts MOUD delivery and ways that you can advocate for your clients and your community.

Outline

  • Common Myths of SUD and MOUD
  • The Most Common Drugs That Cause Mortality
  • The Medications for Opioid Use Disorder
  • “A Special Relationship” Trauma and Opioids
  • Engaging Clients in Medication Assisted Treatments
  • Going Beyond the Individual

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/06/2022

Grief Yoga from a Chair: Transform Addiction into Recovery

When addiction takes over, it can leave us feeling ashamed and helpless as our life becomes unmanageable. Whether the addiction is alcohol, drugs, sex, relationships, or even social media, it can leave us feeling powerless, out of control, and disconnected from others and life. This transformative flow guides us to break free from old habits and patterns that we depend upon that no longer serve us, to connect to more strength within, and to a power greater than ourselves.

Program Information

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence

Dr. Lembke, Chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic, has long been one of the clearest voices regarding problems that come with over-prescribed medications and the unprecedented access to high-reward, high-dopamine stimuli in general. In this question-and-answer recording, Meadows Senior Fellow Dr. Kevin McCauley and Dr. Anna Lembke will discuss how technology, including smartphones and social media, can become “drug-ified,” as well as the difficult but effective strategies that restore the brain’s balance of pleasure and pain and allow us to rediscover passion and find new ways to be free.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Catalogue the three qualities that make a substance or behavior addictive.
  2. Analyze the effects of compulsive overconsumption and repeated exposure on the function of the brain’s dopamine system.
  3. Develop 5 strategies that restore the balance between pain and pleasure as part of recovery from addiction.

Outline

  • The adaptive value of dopamine
  • Dopamine and it’s role in addiction
  • The pleasure/pain balance
  • Intervention: resetting the pleasure/pain balance
  • Rules for safe use of social media: ways to be free

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Soulbriety: Soul Centered Healing From Addiction and Trauma

Recovery is not just about being sober; it’s about true wellness. In this recording we will explore together the unconscious root system, discuss the phenomenology of the soul and the history of the concept in the history of psychotherapy and addiction treatment and recovery, and travel through the individual hero’s journey through addiction and trauma.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Analyze the phenomenology of “soul” as it’s commonly experienced and been defined in the psychological sciences.
  2. Demonstrate the use of active imagination in addiction treatment and recovery.
  3. Demonstrate story-telling and meaning making in addiction treatment and recovery.

Outline

  • Exploring the phenomenological experience of soul in addiction recovery
  • Addiction as a crisis of meaning with existential implications
  • Three aspects of working with the language of the soul that amplify treatment
  • Active imagination practices
  • Story-telling and meaning making practices

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Finding the Wounded Child Inside the Monster: Applying a DBT-Focused Lens to Trauma and Addiction

Studies indicate that approximately 2/3 of all people with substance use disorders report experiencing some form of physical or sexual trauma during childhood. These studies suggest the primacy of utilizing a trauma-focused lens in addressing both addiction and the inherent attachment disturbances and trauma in the treatment space. We’ll cover the key features for successful work with dually-diagnosed client diagnosed with PTSD with Borderline Personality Disorder features and substance abuse disorders. These clients are impacted by early and ongoing developmental trauma. Dr. Webb integrates top-down and bottom-up strategies for addressing the traumatized minds and bodies of clients who have been failed so many times that they have sought “externalized caregivers” in the form of drugs and alcohol. This approach promotes adherence to treatment and strengthens the therapeutic alliance through “authoritative therapy” which promotes a new lens to understand the attachment trauma inherent in PTSD and BPD and to validate the need for a means to regulate an overreactive body and invalidating environment.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Apply authoritative DBT-based therapy techniques to promote felt safety for clients with complex trauma and addiction.
  2. Demonstrate 4 regulating strategies to client with addiction to manage their overtaxed systems.
  3. Utilize DBT-grounded and embodied skills to help clients reclaim a sense of their worthiness to live after trauma and addiction.

Outline

  • Trauma and the developing mind
  • Typical patterns of trauma-related addiction
  • Unique factors in creating a felt sense of safety with clients experiencing addiction
  • DBT-based strategies specifically for trauma-based addiction recovery
  • DBT-based embodied skill building
  • Meaning making in addiction recovery

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Leveraging Neuroscience to Slow the Cycle of Childhood Trauma and Addiction

Most chemicals that people use to medicate or enhance reality have both risks and benefits, at different times and for different people. Nonetheless, regular use of any mind-altering substance causes the exact opposite states to a drug’s original effects. Chronic stimulants result in lethargy, sedatives lead to anxiety and insomnia, and euphoriants guarantee misery.  This session will explain how the brain adapts to addictive drugs by creating the states of craving, tolerance, and dependence that characterize addiction. We’ll address the synergistic influences of genetic predispositions, childhood trauma, and drug use during development that make some people more vulnerable than others.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Analyze how genetic vulnerabilities, socio-cultural influences, and developmental changes impact the brain to give rise to substance use disorders.
  2. Construct a model demonstrating how the brain adapts to regular drug use by creating an "opponent process" to maintain homeostasis, leading to the hallmarks of addiction: tolerance, dependence and craving.
  3. Theorize how addictive drugs exploit and undermine brain circuits that benefit healthy development.

Outline

  • What we know about genetic vulnerabilities and socio-cultural influences on the brain that give rise to substance use disorders
  • The impact of traumatic stress during development
  • How the brain adapts to drug use
  • The opponent process and how it leads to the hallmarks of addiction: tolerance, dependence and craving

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Young Adults & the Addictive Cycle: What Lies Beneath

Rates of anxiety and depression among young adults have been skyrocketing for years. Unsurprisingly, an increase in addictive behaviors tracks closely. Although most therapists understand how depression and other clinical issues fuel the addictive cycle, they’re often not aware of how effective treatment for young people differs from approaches targeted toward adults. In this session, presenters explore common experiences negatively impacting this age group as well as practical interventions that elicit and work with young people’s core beliefs to direct treatment. You’ll discover how to:

  • Uncover critical experiences, such as cyberbully, sexual assault, emotional abandonment, and loss, that often underlie co-occurring disorders
  • Effectively address clients’ deep-rooted views about themselves and the world
  • Use practical tools, such as the Addiction Interaction Template and Behavioral Acting Out framework, to offer direction for healing and an understanding of the function of addictive patterns related to behavior
  • Explore the interplay of trauma and technology

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Distinguish five critical experiences that fuel the mental health and addiction problems of young people.
  2. Implement two practical tools in sessions to disrupt the addictive process.
  3. Theorize how multiple addictions can interact with each other impacting treatment, particularly in youth.
  4. Categorize the stages of the Acting Out cycle.

Outline

  • Identify five critical experiences that fuel the mental health and addiction problems of young people
  • Apply the core elements to a healthy treatment process
  • Describe the interplay of various forms of trauma with use of technology
  • Describe practical tools for clinical use

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Leveraging Neuroscience in the Treatment & Recovery of Trauma and Addiction

More than 10,000 people die each day from excessive use of mind-altering chemicals. This session will discuss how advances in neuroscience might account for, and help to reduce, suffering from addiction through better treatments. General principles will be applied to illustrate specific risk factors and neural changes associated with addiction to cannabis and opiates, and we’ll brainstorm about how brain science can help inform more effective prevention and intervention efforts.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Theorize how the endocannabinoid system facilitates the trajectory from child to adult, and why marijuana use during adolescence has negative impacts on brain structure and mental health.
  2. Demonstrate how neural circuits related to stress and pain give rise to opiate addiction, and how finding ways to better cope with these states can facilitate recovery.
  3. Appraise the impact of prenatal and multigenerational effects of addictive drugs foster the cycle of trauma and addiction.

Outline

  • How the endocannabinoid system facilitates the trajectory from child to adult
  • Why marijuana use during adolescence has negative impacts on brain structure and mental health
  • How neural circuits related to stress and pain give rise to opiate addiction, and how finding ways to better cope with these states can facilitate recovery
  • How prenatal and multigenerational effects of addictive drugs foster a cycle of trauma and addiction

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Grief Yoga from a Chair: Transform Trauma into Resilience

Trauma can be anything that overwhelms our capacity to cope and respond. When feeling helpless and out of control, it’s important to tap into resources that we can turn to feel safe and self-regulate our mind and body. This transformative flow is a guide to feel more centered and present with your breath and body, to safely discharge and release traumatic stress, and to offer more compassion and kindness within to embody resilience.

Program Information

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/07/2022

Navigating Racialized Trauma in the Context of Addictions

In this session, we'll look at the interaction of racialized trauma and addiction, on both the individual and collective levels. Then we'll explore a set of somatic healing practices that can support the healing of both trauma and addiction. Lastly, we'll use the lens of Somatic Abolitionism to examine how we can help our clients create positive feedback loops of growth, emergence, and healing.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Theorize how racialized trauma and addiction impact one another.
  2. Assessing the distinctions between individual and collective traumatic stress through a racialized lens.
  3. Propose interventions for racialized trauma in the context of addictive behaviors.
  4. Demonstrate 5 interventions for racial trauma in the context of addictive behaviors.

Outline

  • The Five types of trauma responses
  • The differences between individual and collective traumatic experiences
  • How racialized trauma is experienced in the context of addiction
  • The Five anchors of healing and recovery
  • Tools of addiction recovery from a racialized trauma perspective
  • The collective healing of trauma and addiction from a racialized trauma perspective

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

Plugged In, Turned On, Burnt Out: How Technology Affects Sexuality and Relationships

Each day we move deeper into a modern era where technology blends into every aspect of our lives, including sexual identities, expressions, courtship behaviors, and relationship formation. However, it can sometimes be hard for therapists to help when things go awry, because of an ever-shifting digital landscape which asks a never-ending question of what is right and what is right now? Change brings needed growth, but also unexpected consequences that we are grappling with in real time. This session provides a basic overview of some of the sexual technology currently out in the world, what may be on the horizon and the joys and challenges new technology bring to an already complex part of our lives.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Analyze 3 areas beyond pornography where technology has impacted modern sexuality.
  2. Appraise the concept of technostress and how that applies to technology and sexuality.
  3. Conduct assessments with at least 3 new questions related to sexuality and technology that they may add to the assessment process in their therapeutic practice.

Outline

  • Technology is more than we think it is
  • The broad spectrum of technology’s affects on sexuality and realationships
  • Therapeutic, medical, legal, and ethical implications of technological choices
  • The rise of the phenomena of sexual addiction and tech addictions
  • Intakes and screening for tech addictions
  • Uncovering issues early in assessment and treatment

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

Where Addiction Recovery Meets Grief Work: A Critical Intersection for Therapy

All grief does not have trauma, but all trauma has grief.  Addiction work often needs to include both. In this session, David will cover the intersections of grief, trauma and addiction as a professional who has worked in the field of grief for decades as well as a bereaved father.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate 5 techniques, tools and principles in the field of addiction to help cope with all types of loss.
  2. Propose 3 ways to use meaning to help create purpose.
  3. Propose 2 ways to resolve the internal struggle of related to asking “why?”.
  4. Utilize 2 ways that include new information on brain science to address guilt, shame and stigma associated with grief.

Outline

  • Meaning-making as a new tool for dealing with addiction
  • Techniques for strength-based grief counseling
  • Post traumatic growth vs Post traumatic stress
  • Seeing loss through the eyes of addiction
  • Witnessing vs “Fixing” Grief
  • The consequences of trying to find meaning too early
  • Loss by Addiction: Meaning-making for healing self-blame
  • Understand the roles they did and didn’t play in an addiction death
  • Help Clients Change Their Thinking Around Loss
  • Strategies to address addiction as an illness
  • Use positive psychology to increase the possibility of post-traumatic growth
  • How to decrease catastrophizing after loss
  • Learn ways to instill good memories instead of painful ones

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

Integrative Harm Reduction Psychotherapy (IHRP) for Treating Addiction and Trauma

The widely accepted view of addiction as a disease has contributed an “abstinence-only” treatment system that has failed to be helpful to the large majority of people who struggle with substance use when trauma is a part of the picture. These patients must be welcomed into treatment while they continue to use substances so trauma can be identified and processed as a precondition for addressing the addictive response.  This session will introduce an integrative harm reduction psychotherapy that engages people in therapy while they are actively using substances and addresses trauma and addiction simultaneously. A real clinical case of trauma and addiction that was successfully treated by Tatarsky will be presented to illustrate the approach.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Assess how addictive behavior reflects the interplay of biology, meaning, habit, and social context.
  2. Theorize why the harm reduction stance is often essential to effective treatment of addiction when trauma is in the picture.
  3. Describe seven therapeutic tasks combining relational, CBT, and mindfulness interventions.
  4. Use strategies to address risky behaviors in the treatment of addictions, particularly when traumatic stress is involved.

Outline

  • Re-framing addiction in a way that supports treatment & recovery
  • The benefits of harm reduction as a therapeutic frame
  • Seven therapeutic tasks of harm reduction treatment
  • Seven strategies for facilitating positive change during harm reduction treatment

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

IFS & The Treatment of Addictions: How to Embrace Addictive Parts

Therapists regularly treat clients who struggle with some form of addiction, whether it be from substances, food, gambling, or sex. Unfortunately, the treatment can itself sometimes induce guilt and shame, especially when discussing the negative impact commonly associated with most addictive substances. In this session we’ll discuss IFS, a non-pathologizing treatment modality, helps clients “befriend” their addictive parts in a way that allows them to learn about their positive protective intention.

Note: This product is not affiliated with the IFS Institute and does not qualify toward IFS Institute credits or IFS Institute certification.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Appraise the IFS model and how it applies to clients experiencing addictions.
  2. Identify at least 2 roles of emotions, pain & trauma within a person to help indicate reasons for common client reactions such as substance abuse, suicidal thoughts, obsessing, conflict avoidance, binging, cutting and more.
  3. Assess a client’s diagnosis and symptoms through IFS.
  4. Summarize the process of befriending addictive parts.
  5. Identify at least one intervention to deal with the conflicts (Polarizations) in relation to addictions.

Outline

  • The critical first step before trying to stop an addiction
  • How to offer an alternative solution apart from the addiction to overcome pain
  • Exploring the traumatic wounds and how they develop into addictions
  • How to address biology and habits in parallel to trauma recovery

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

The Seven Tasks of Integrative Harm Reduction Psychotherapy (IHRP): Practical Skills & Strategies

The integrative harm reduction model of therapy practically helps address how trauma and addiction intersect and how to treat both in therapy – without requiring abstinence, pre-conditions to treatment, or imposing pre-conceived values or agendas that can often de-rail treatment of addictions. This session will focus on implementing IHRP’s seven therapeutic tasks.  We will demonstrate and practice practical skills and strategies associated with each task that participants can bring to their work.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate Agenda-setting and treatment planning in IHRP.
  2. Propose 4 unique engagement skills to facilitate positive change in trauma and addictions.
  3. Utilize seven therapeutic tasks of IHRP in treating trauma-based addictions.

Outline

  • The practice of IHRP in dual diagnoses of trauma and addictions
  • The core harm reduction focus
  • The unique therapeutic engagement skills in working with addictions
  • Specific strategies for facilitating positive change

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

IFS & The Treatment of Addictions: Biology, Healing and Habits

Beneath addiction and traumatic stress lies important neurobiological processes that are altered. We will discuss, through the lens of Internal Family Systems Therapy and neurobiology, how to address behaviors and biological conditions commonly associated with many addictive behaviors and to help clients ultimately heal from the wounds beneath their addictions.

Note: This product is not affiliated with the IFS Institute and does not qualify toward IFS Institute credits or IFS Institute certification.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Organize the types of behavioral and substance-based addictions and the addictive cycle.
  2. Assess the neurobiological correlates that are altered in traumatic stress and addictions and a person’s sense of self.
  3. Theorize on the impact of trauma and addictions on a person’s sense of self.
  4. Propose three primary targets of psychotherapy for addictions based on neurobiological research.

Outline

  • Common types and patterns of addiction
  • The important neurobiology behind the addictive process and how it guides therapy
  • What many addiction treatments miss: working with the client’s sense of self
  • Addressing “double trauma”
  • Current research into psychedelics and addictions
  • How addictions are healed through the lens of neurobiology

Target Audience

  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Other Mental Health Professions

Copyright : 10/08/2022

The Myth of Normal in an Insane Culture

In this address, Gabor Mate will discuss how in our hyper-stressed, materialistic society, physical and mental illness are not aberrations but natural outcomes of a way of life inimical to genuine human needs.

Treatment, therefore, must go beyond a focus on symptoms and diagnoses to address the causes of dysfunction from a bio-psycho-social perspective.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Evaluate the current model of behaviorally focused parenting by highlighting how the failure to promote attachment results in an interference of the development of children's brains.
  2. Investigate how the impact of early childhood adaptability impacts adulthood, leading to adults with greater mental health, medical, and substance abuse problems.
  3. Defend the importance of having a trauma-informed understanding when treating clients and the ability to recognize that trauma underlies many of the problems clients present with in psychotherapy and medical treatment.
  4. Appraise how physical and mental illness are natural outcomes of a way of life inimical to genuine human needs, and the ways in which treatment must go beyond a focus on symptoms to address the causes of dysfunction from a bio-psycho-social perspective.

Outline

Limitations of the Medical Model

  • Societal Increase of Drug Overdose, Diseases, Mental Health Issues
  • Mind & Body as Separate
  • Individuals as Separate from One Another
  • Individuals as Separate from Environment
  • Medical Model=Individual Biology
  • Addictions as Personal Choices or Genetic Pre-Disposition

Interpersonal Biology

  • Biopsychosocial Model
  • The Societal Epidemic of Loneliness
  • A Society that Engenders Isolation & Loneliness
  • Human Needs & Stressors

Societal Denial of Human Needs

  • Behavioral-Focused Parenting
  • Failure to Meet Attachment Needs

Brain Development

  • Impact of Environment on Brain Development
  • Impact of Early Childhood Adaptations on Adulthood
  • Quality of Parental Interaction on Psychological & Brain Development

Trauma

  • Recognizing Childhood Trauma
  • Trauma-Informed Care

Target Audience

  • Psychologists
  • Physicians
  • Addiction Counselors
  • Counselors
  • Social Workers
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Other Behavioral Health Professionals

 

Copyright : 03/22/2019

Helping Make the Unbearable Tolerable: Trauma & the Treatment of Addictions

Unlike stress, which resolves itself after the event is over, trauma causes people to become physiologically and mentally stuck — hyper-aroused and/or frozen, unable to manage their bodily arousal systems.

This recording will clarify the neurobiological underpinnings of these broken biological systems, clarify how addictive behaviors of all kinds are invariably rooted in desperate attempts to manage and discuss the evidence-based methods that are available to help re-regulate mind and body.

Program Information

Objectives

  1. Determine the neurobiological underpinnings of the arousal system that lead to trauma and increase clients’ substance abuse and addiction cycle.
  2. Employ several evidence-based methods that foster re-regulation of mind and body that can aid in reduction of symptomology.
  3. Investigate how addictive substances are used as coping mechanisms for unresolved traumatic stress.

Outline

The Neurobiology of Trauma

  • The body’s arousal system in the face of trauma

The Interplay of Trauma and Addiction

  • How addictive substances are used as coping mechanisms
  • Evidence-based methods that can foster re-regulation of the mind and body 

Target Audience

  • Counselors
  • Social Workers
  • Psychologists
  • Psychotherapists
  • Therapists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Addiction Counselors
  • Case Managers
  • Physicians
  • Nurses
  • Other Mental Health Professionals

Copyright : 10/15/2020